ANIMASIVO - Festival of Contemporary Animation of Mexico City

From November 29 to December 3, 2017

10th Edition

 

 

“I honestly believe in the palliative capacity of poetry, in its power
comforting in the face of disorders and discouragement that history can bring us. ”

 

José Caballero Bonald

 

 

 

ANIMASIVO - Festival of Contemporary Animation of Mexico City presents the image of its tenth edition by Lapiztola, a Oaxacan collective formed by designers Roberto Vega and Rosario Martínez, and the architect Yankel Balderas..


Lapiztola has made the image for ANIMASIVE 2017. Sebastian is the boy who puts face to all the desires and emotions that we feel (vi) seeing reality. A graphic idea for the tenth edition of the festival that proposes visual poetry as a tool for denunciation and suggestion.

In a situation where the daily life of violence in Mexico has exceeded any type of limits, a poetic proposal is urgently needed and necessary, to generate a daily life of poetry (and animated image) in the Mexico we live and suffer, that Visual poetry means that every day does not hurt so much.

 

Lapiztola

In 2006 a political revolution took place in the city of Oaxaca. For more than seven months the outrage over the violent response of the state governor to a teachers' strike led to a street art movement that saw how the walls of Oaxaca expressed their outrage. From this uprising Lapiztola was born.

 

Taking its name from the words pencil and gun, the group was inspired by the events of their hometown that has led them to create works that highlight and denounce injustices. They work mainly with stencil and screen printing, create street art to protest and communicate visually with society, while introducing a personal touch in an urban space.

 

His work has extended far beyond Oaxaca and the events of 2006. In recent years, his work, which ranges from dark to playful, has highlighted everything from the cult to drug traffickers and the use of Genetically modified corn until the plight of Central American migrants and the persistent pain of mothers who have waited decades to bury the bodies of their missing children.